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Home / Immigration

Important information
In order to slow down any further spread of the coronavirus, please note that advance registration by e-mail is obligatory for people visiting the immigration authority. You can reach employees of the immigration authority by phone 06221 58-17520 or e-mail: zuwanderung-servicepoint@heidelberg.de.
Submissions and requests can be submitted via e-mail, by post or can be placed in our home mail box. Thank you for your understanding.

Your team of the immigration authority

Important information
The Ministry of the Interior, for Construction and Homeland informs about the consequences of a regulated brexit here
The foreigners’ authority (Ausländerbehörde) will inform british citizens and their families, who live in Heidelberg, about any required measures concerninig their residence permit on their german website. A registration at the foreigners' authority is not required.

How to find us
Visit us at the "Landfriedkomplex", Bergheimer Straße 147, in front of the restaurant "Moe`s Roadhouse". The entrance is situated on the right next to the glass front building.

New in Heidelberg?

Welcome Home! This is your Heidelberg-Handbook (1.452 MB)

Familie in der Flüchtlingsunterkunft Hardtstraße (Foto: Dorn)

Guide to the Health Care System for Migrants
Find your way around the complicated German health care system, despite possible language barriers, with useful pointers and information about counselling services. You can download the brochure here or get it from the City's Administration Offices or the Public Health Office, Kurfürsten-Anlage 38-40.
English version (1.014 MB)
Turkish version (1.113 MB)
Arabic version (890.5 KB)

Don't hesitate to contact us:

Central Administration Office
Zuwanderungsrecht
Bergheimer Straße 147 (Landfriedgebäude)
69115 Heidelberg
Phone +49 6221 58-17520
Fax +49 6221 58-17380

An official giving advice to a new arrival (Photo: Dorn)

Immigration

Help for new arrivals

Heidelberg is popular among residents both old and new. Of its 160,000 residents – who come from 160 different countries – 56,000 have a migration background, some of them receiving an official “certificate of naturalization” from the city. By clicking on the links below you can access a wide range of information about moving to Germany and Heidelberg. If you have questions or need more personalized advice, the administrative offices (Bürgerämter) in the various districts of the city are there to help.

Welcome

Landfried complex (Photo: City of Heidelberg)

The International Welcome Center Heidelberg (IWCH) offers foreigners special administrative services and is also a meeting place.


First informations

Consultation in the administrative office in Rohrbach (Photo: Rothe)

The Service Point is the first port of call for information about entering and staying in Germany. You can simply drop in during opening hours.


Applying for asylum

Applicants for asylum during language learning (Photo: Rothe)

What documents you need, where you can live, what work you can do... there is a lot you need to know when applying for asylum in Germany.


Integration in Heidelberg

Opening of the Intercultural Center (Interkulturelles Zentrum) (Photo: Rothe)

Heidelberg has a real culture of welcome and acceptance, so even though the city’s population is becoming more diverse all the time, people feel at home here.


Studying in Heidelberg

Lecture hall of the University of Heidelberg (Photo: Hoppe)

Residence permits are available to enable a foreign national to study at a German University.


Working in Heidelberg

Working in Heidelberg (Photo: InnovationLab GmbH)

Who is allowed to work in Heidelberg? Where can I get my foreign qualifications officially recognized in Germany?


Residence titles

Consultation (Photo: Dorn)

Nationals of non-EU countries must hold a “residence title” while in Germany.


Marriage & family

Kids at the "Neckarwiese" in Heidelberg. (Photo: Dorn)

Spouses or children may be able to move to live in Germany with their relatives.